Why are arizona teas so cheap?

Don Vultaggio co-owns the company with his sons, Wesley, on the left, and Spencer, who serve as creative director and marketing director, respectively. Arizona has pledged to pay 99 cents since 1996, when it began printing the price directly on cans to prevent retailers from raising prices themselves.

Why are arizona teas so cheap?

Don Vultaggio co-owns the company with his sons, Wesley, on the left, and Spencer, who serve as creative director and marketing director, respectively. Arizona has pledged to pay 99 cents since 1996, when it began printing the price directly on cans to prevent retailers from raising prices themselves. 100% natural tea brands charge more because people who want natural tea are willing to pay more. So what's going on? According to the Los Angeles Times, the company has decided that it is willing to make less money with those oversized cans if that means they don't have to raise prices.

“I'm committed to that price of 99 cents when things go against you, you tighten your belt,” Don Vultaggio, founder and president of AriZona, told the media outlet. I don't want to do what the bread people, the gas people and everyone else do. Consumers don't need another price increase from someone like me. The Times also notes that the price of AriZona iced tea has remained stable, even though the cost of high-fructose corn syrup has increased by 300 percent over the past 20 years, and the cost of aluminum has doubled in just the past 18 months.

The VERIFY team works to separate fact from fiction so that you can understand what is true and what is false. VERIFY also searched the Internet for 23-ounce cans of AriZona iced Tea and found that Safeway, Fred Meyer and others U. Whether you're eating slightly more expensive pizza or slightly cheaper donuts, at least if you shower it with an AriZona iced tea, you'll know you're getting a bargain. Best known for its cherry blossom aesthetic, its considerable size of 23 ounces and its reliable price of 99 cents, Arizona iced tea is one of those gas station staples whose prices make it a safe and solid product, like your mother's lasagna or the rhythms of Old Faithful.

The income of these families goes largely to basic needs such as rent, food and gas, making products such as iced tea, donuts and other snacks a luxury. Arizona packages its recycled aluminum cans, which use about half as much aluminum as those of other beverage companies, at about twice the speed it used in the 90s. The company began printing the price of 99 cents on its cans in 1996, and that has become part of the now iconic AriZona design. AriZona Iced Tea responded to the viral tweet on its official account, confirming that the price of the drink is still 99 cents in the United States.

Instead of increasing the value of its iced tea, the company has chosen to cut additional expenses that could increase the price. Arizona Beverages helps keep costs and large cans low by relying on word of mouth rather than expensive advertising campaigns and celebrity endorsements, which is not entirely different from how Aldi also keeps its prices so low. AriZona has sold canned iced teas for the same price since their launch in 1992, CNN Business and TODAY reported. Arizona knows that its 99-cent can has a follower base that marketing can't buy, and thankfully, it doesn't plan to change the price anytime soon.

While fans of the company love the price (this helped Arizona push Snapple, the former industry leader, off the top of the tea list), not everyone is too happy with a 99-cent beverage. This is also probably what has attracted the attention that Arizona has gained in recent weeks as gas prices rise and rising inflation drains the pockets of working-class families.

Eloise Dingeldein
Eloise Dingeldein

Certified web ninja. General tv advocate. Wannabe music expert. Infuriatingly humble food junkie. Unapologetic food lover. Avid tv maven.

Leave Reply

All fileds with * are required